01. Why should I use the templates?
The templates have been designed to ensure that your job will move quickly and smoothly through our print and packaging departments. Differences as little as 0.1 cm can cause problems in printing and packaging. Any file that is not provided on our templates may incur a $75 out-of-template fee to cover our labor for adjusting your files.
02. Can I just use the measurements from a CD or DVD that I own?
No. A jewel case or DVD case from Train Records may look the same as every other at first glance, but each company has slightly different dimensions. Even a slight deviation from Train Records specifications can cause problems in the printing and packaging process.
03. What programs should I use?
We can accept anything that is Adobe photoshop compatible. Please ensure that the final file is at least 300 dpi and in CMYK. Here is a list of file formats we can accept: Adobe Photoshop (.psd), Adobe (.pdf), JPEG (.jpg) Fonts: If you do not flatten the image and would like vector based fonts please include the  TrueType fonts. For PC, each TrueType font will be a single .ttf file.
04. Why don’t I see templates for Publisher or other applications?
Train Records is committed to staying current with desktop publishing software and we accept files from most major page layout, illustration and image-editing applications. Some popular desktop applications like Microsoft Publisher are suitable for printing flyers to your home inkjet printer, but are not powerful enough to work in a professional printing environment. Similarly, we cannot accept any layouts or images created in Word or any other word-processing program.
05. I’ve downloaded the templates. Now what do I do?
Once you’ve opened the template, do not make any changes to the template itself (e.g. changing or deleting any of the crop marks, changing the page size, etc.). Our templates are created to maximize our in-house productivity. If you alter the template pages, we will have to reformat your job to fit into the original templates, and you will be billed for the work. For maximum compatibility, our templates are saved back to the oldest version we support. You should save your documents in the version you’re actually using. For example, if you are working in Photoshop CS5, do not save your layout file back to Photoshop CS2; save it as Photoshop CS5.
06. Which template(s) do I use?
The templates on our website are organized according to product and include illustrations to help you determine which templates you need. We've included the templates on each corresponding product page as well as the main template download page. Don't forget you'll also need a template for printing on the disc itself.
07. Do I need to supply layout files for every part of my package?
Yes. If you don’t provide layout files for every part of your package, you may have to pay design fees for us to create the missing files. The most commonly omitted files are the on-disc printing.
08. What are all these type safety boxes and lines in the templates?
We have placed type safety boxes, cut lines, bleed lines, and other items in the templates to help us prepare your job for printing. Do not delete or move these elements. Guides and overlays are on non-printing layers that can be turned off or sent to the back if they interfere with your design work. Consult your application’s help file or manual for information on adjusting layers. If you alter the template pages, we will have to reformat your job onto the original templates, and you will be billed for this work.
09. How much space should I leave for a barcode?
If your project is going to have a barcode on it (recommended for retail sales, additional 35$ charge) we suggest designating a location (typically on the traycard, or the back cover of your DVD case/digipak/sleeve/etc.) by placing a white rectangle in your design that measures at least 1.25" wide by .5" high.
10. What is bleed and type safety?
Bleed is extending any color, photo, or design elements past the cut line. Our print shop trims printed pieces in stacks of hundreds of sheets at a time. This is much faster than trimming individual pieces, at the cost of a little accuracy. Bleed gives the print shop a margin of error when trimming, so that if the cut is a little off, the white of the paper won’t show along the edge. We request you add at least 1/8-inch of bleed to your layouts. Each template has guidelines set up so you can see exactly how much bleed you need to add to your layouts. These are generally the outermost guides. Type safety margins are the opposite of bleed. If you put important information such as a song title or an important part of a photo right up against the crop line, some of it may get cut off. We recommend that you keep your type and other important elements 1/8" inside the crop marks. Each template has guidelines set up so you can see exactly how much safety margin to allow. These are generally the innermost guides.
11. How small can I make my type?
Generally, for your paper print you can go as small as 5 points for black type on a light or white background, 6 points for white type on a dark, black, or complex background (also known as reverse type). This varies depending on the typeface used. For on-disc printing, we recommend type be no smaller than 6 points, 8 points for reverse type. For smaller type, such as lyrics and credits, we recommend you use simpler typefaces such as Arial, Helvetica, or Times New Roman. Display faces—the “fancier” fonts with lots of detail, like Vivaldi or Edwardian Script—are designed to be used at large sizes, and can be difficult to read even at 10 points.
12. What’s the difference between CMYK and RGB?
CMYK and RGB are two different color models, and understanding the difference can mean producing a great-looking insert rather than a muddy, disappointing one. We’ll have to delve into a little science to explain this difference. The RGB color model is used by monitors, televisions, scanners, and digital cameras. A monitor uses very small bands of red, green, and blue light to generate color. For a quick science project, put a drop of water on the front of your monitor in a white area, and it will act like a magnifying glass. You’ll be able to see the red, green, and blue bands. RGB is additive because when you add all three colors together, you get white light; when you turn off all three lights, you get black. By mixing varying amounts of red, green, and blue light, you can create most other colors. The paper of a magazine, catalog, or CD booklet can’t generate light like a computer monitor. It has to rely on reflected light, and the subtractive color model CMYK. When you add cyan, magenta, and yellow together (CMY), you get a color close to black, and when you don’t lay down any ink, you get white—that is, the white of the paper. A fourth color, black, is added for economical and practical reasons, and is referred to by ‘K’ so as not to be confused with blue. By mixing varying amounts of cyan, magenta, yellow, and black inks, you can create most other colors. All commercial, full-color printing uses CMYK inks. So why is the difference important? Most colors created on your RGB monitor can be duplicated using CMYK inks, but not all. Your RGB monitor is generating light, so it can create some bright colors that can’t be duplicated on any CMYK printing press. Paper can only reflect light, so if you print the super-bright RGB colors in CMYK, they get a lot duller. If you’re designing artwork in an RGB color space, we’ll have to convert it to CMYK to print. Depending on your artwork, the colors might shift a little or a lot. We ask you to provide all your images in CMYK. If there are any color shifts, you’ll be able to see them and take steps to correct it. If you supply RGB images, we’ll make the CMYK conversion here, and show you a proof. If you want to make any changes to your images at that point, your job may be delayed and incur additional charges. It’s much better for you to supply us with CMYK files up front.
13. What’s the difference between process and spot colors?
Process color uses translucent CMYK inks laid on top of one another to fool your eye into seeing other colors. A spot color ink is a specially-mixed hue that is not made by combining two or more inks, but rather is a single ink of a specific color. Spot colors can be brighter or more saturated than process colors, or have special properties, such as metallic gold or fluorescent green. Train Records uses process colors in printing packaging, and spot colors when printing on-disc. Spot colors are available in package printing for an additional fee.
14. Why isn’t my RGB file useable for my 3-color, on-disc printing?
RGB is an additive color format, made by generating light, while on-disc printing uses a subtractive color format, made by reflecting light. On your computer, red, green, and blue combine to make white; on a disc, they would combine to make a muddy black.
15. Will the printing on my CD / DVD match my booklet or digipak?
All packaging is printed in process (CMYK) color, while standard on-disc printing is done with spot (PMS) inks. While many spot inks and their process equivalents look similar, some colors—blue and orange in particular—look very different. In general, the spot inks used on the disc are brighter and more saturated than their CMYK equivalents. If matching the disc to the rest of the package is important to you, you should design with a Pantone solid-to-process guide handy. That guide will show you which PMS spot colors have close process equivalents. If you upgrade to four-color offset printing on your disc, you will greatly increase the chances of your disc matching the rest of your packaging. Since the packaging will be printed using offset lithography, which is a different process than the silkscreen or offset printing used on the discs, we still won’t be able to provide you with an exact match. You should note however that our years of experience in the trade have made us very effective at providing a very close match.
16. What are the differences between printing on the disc face and printing the rest of the packaging that I should keep in mind when designing?
Discs are printed with a different process than the rest of the packaging. Booklets, digipaks, and jackets are printed with process (CMYK) inks, using a high-quality process called offset lithography. Discs are printed with spot colors, and are silkscreened. There are a couple of key differences to keep in mind: • The tonal range that we can hold while silkscreening the discs is 15-85%. Tones lighter than 15% may blow out to zero, and those darker than 85% may fill in completely. As a result, we do not recommend using very dark or very light photos on the disc. • High-contrast images work best. Subtle changes in tone can be lost in the silkscreening process. • Gradients or blends do not print well, and can look uneven or blotchy. We strongly recommend avoiding gradients or blends on the disc.
17. I like how my design looks off of my home printer. Can you match the color if I send in a sample?
No. While inexpensive, ink-jet printers use same CMYK ink model that our printing presses use, the actual inks are not identical. If you printed your design on an HP inkjet or a Canon color laser printer for example, they would all look at least a little different, because each company manufactures their inks a little differently. Since your printer and our press are not calibrated to each other, we cannot accept your printout as an accurate color guide. We will send you a Adobe pdf proof and if colour matching is critical you can request and Epson high-quality proof of your job for you to approve before it goes to press. This proof will be a reliable indicator of final print quality and colours but carries a charge of 80$ per proof.
18. How do I make my image circular or round for printing on the disc?
You don’t need to make your image round to fit on the disc. All the templates come with a circular area for masking any rectangular image. Each application handles this differently, so consult your software’s manual or help file for information on masking your images into the template.
19. My files seem really large. Is this okay?
Yes, this is normal. A properly saved 5" x 5" scan, in CMYK color mode at 300 dpi, will take up to 8-10 MB on your hard drive. Photoshop, Illustrator and other professional layout programs will generally create large files. Our online uploader solves the issue of transferring both numerous and large files. We can accept up to 20GB per transfer.
20. Can I send my files in over the Internet?
You may email files under 10 MB to our art department: art@trainrec.com or directly to your Product Specialist. If your files are over 10 MB, you will need to use our upload portal.
21. I’m supposed to send in my fonts. How do I do that?
The primary font format for Window-based computers is TrueType. All of your installed TrueType fonts are usually located in the /WINDOWS/FONTS folder, and contain the .ttf file extension. The filenames can be cryptic, but if you double-click on a font file, you’ll get a preview window so you know you’re copying the right ones. Please do not copy the entire Fonts folder: just copy the individual TrueType font files themselves. If you own any Adobe products for PC, there may be fonts stored in c:/Program Files/Common Files/Adobe/Fonts. Users of Adobe Multiple Master fonts (Mac or PC): At this time we can no longer accept Multiple Master fonts, as our current software cannot utilize these fonts properly. If you are supplying your layout in Photoshop we can still accept .psd files with live text layers using Multiple Master fonts, but we will be unable to edit or modify these text layers.
22. The 5 most common problems with client-supplied design jobs
1) Failure to remove template guide lines. Before you send in your job, make sure you’ve removed all the templates lines. 2) Image resolution is too low (less than 300 dpi) or supplied in RGB instead of CMYK. 3) Insufficient bleed or safety margins. 4) Failure to include fonts. 5) Failure to supply all parts of the job on the Train Records templates. For a complete explanation, see 01. Why should I use the templates? and 07. Do I need to supply layout files for every part of my package?
23. A final checklist
When you’re ready to submit your job to Train Records, make sure that you’re including all of the following items: • Files for each part of the job (insert, tray card, on-disc printing, etc.) • All the fonts used in the layouts • Any special instructions you may have. You should also do a final proofread of all your text and layouts to make sure everything is accurate and complete. Organize the files on the disk clearly. Set up separate folders for layout files, images, fonts, not-for-output files, etc. If you submit a disk with dozens of unorganized and/or unnecessary files, your project will be delayed.

Artwork FAQ

General FAQs

Simply order online 24/7 by clicking on any product, select your options and click Add to Cart - just like any other online store. Once you're done click Checkout.

During checkout select your payment method: Credit/Debit Card, PayPal, Interac e-Transfer or Start Now - Pay Later. (What's Start Now - Pay Later? - See next question below)

As soon as your checkout is complete you will receive an order confirmation email with your order number and a link to the upload page.
Now you can upload your files to complete your order.

Once we have your artwork files we will setup the artwork and send you PDF proofs via email for approval before we start production.

With our "Start Now - Pay Later" option on checkout, yes you can!

Start Now - Pay Later, allows you to place your order on our website before making a payment. Once your order is placed, you'll get an order number and upload link sent to your email. Send us your files and we'll setup your artwork and email you the PDF proofs for approval.

Once we have your approval we will email you an invoice with a simple payment button that allows you to pay using Visa, MasterCard, American Express or PayPal.

Please note, we do require payment in full to move into production.

Once you place an order, you'll receive an email with your order number and an upload link. From there you can upload your content and artwork. We have a HUGE 20GB transfer limit which is more than enough to handle any project. We can also accept the content and artwork all in the same transfer!

Note: At any time you can also upload the files to us using the Upload button at the very top of all our website pages.

The only extra costs are shipping and taxes.

We've done our best to keep the pricing simple for you. All the packages on our website are comprehensive, meaning they include everything you need to get the project done. All our products offer a complete list of what's included on their product page.

Please note: There are extras that can be added on at an additional charge, such as graphic assistance, physical hardcopy proofs, test presses and barcodes. If you're still unsure about what you're getting give us a call 416.446.0918 or email us; info@trainrec.com.

This depends on what you ordered and the complexity of your package.

Standard production times are as follows:

•CDs   7-10 Business Days (2 Weeks)

•DVDs   7-10 Business Days (2 Weeks)

•USBs   10-12 Business Days (Just under 3 Weeks)

•Vinyl   8-10 Weeks

If you need your project completed quickly, we offer several stages of Rush options, the different Production Time options are available on each of the product pages. If you're concerned about hitting a particular date or if you're just a little unsure about the timing, give us a call 416.446.0918 or email sales@trainrec.com.

Replicated discs (often referred to as pressed discs) are created by melting down the plastics and physically pressing your data into the surface of the disc. Duplicated discs (often referred to as burned discs) encode your data onto the disc using a laser to burn microscopic holes into the dye layer of a recordable CDR or DVDR, just like your CD/DVD burner in your computer.

Replicated discs are the standard for major commercial releases and a requirement for any commercial retailer selling CDs or DVDs. Replicated discs are all and all a better product, they only suffer from 2 drawbacks:

1. Replicated discs have a higher setup costs, because of this we only start replication on orders of 250+.

2. The process for replicated discs takes longer.

Duplicated discs have lots of advantages, too. They don't carry the high setup costs, which makes them a great solution for short runs of 1-249 discs. They also offer really fast turn around times. We've produced orders of up to 30,000 CDs in 24 hours by duplicating them.

If you plan to sell your product in stores, you’ll need a barcode. The cost to purchase a barcode from us is $25.00 CAD.

Shipping depending on your location and the service you selected on Checkout. Different shipping companies offer different delivery times, shipping can take as little as 6 hours or as long as 2 weeks. Our preferred shipping company is Federal Express.

Contact your Product Specialist 1 (877) 237-2432 to get an accurate quote for shipping. For orders of over 3,000 pieces, shipment by truck often offers the best value in terms of time and cost. Just ask your Product Specialist and we’ll help you find a shipping solution that suits your needs.

We've been in business since 1999!

Actually our roots start even before then but we opened our doors to the general public and started replicating CDs officially in 1999. Before that we were an independent music label with manufacturing capabilities. At that time we pressed CDs solely for our own catalogue.

We offer both prices online.

By default our website lists prices in Canadian dollars (CAD). However this can easily be changed to US dollars (USD) be selecting your currency from the top right hand corner of any page on our website.

The great thing about being in the USA is that when we ship from Canada, you don't have to pay sales tax! That's right, the price you see online is the price you pay (including whatever shipping option you've selected).

Yes. All of our work on your project is done in-house to the most exacting standards in the industry. We guarantee that each disc will be an exact copy of the original. We will replace or refund you the cost of any discs that do not match the master you provided perfectly.

CDs

When album information is displayed on a computer, it’s a result of your CD being registered in an online database (also known as CDDB). To get more information on how to register your CD onto the most popular databases go to www.ifpi.org. A similar but different technology is that of CD-TEXT, which shows album information that is actually encoded on your supplied master disc. CD-TEXT will only display on players that support it. The most common CD-TEXT capable players available today are aftermarket car stereos. If you don’t know whether or not your master has been encoded with CD-TEXT, let us know and we’ll be happy to check for you. We can accommodate your needs, simply ask your Product Specialist for more information.

A release/catalogue number is a short alphanumeric code used by distributors and record companies to identify, track, and catalog specific recordings. Unless you have multiple titles you may not need to create a catalogue number. However, you can always make one up to make you look bigger than you are! For example, Train Records first release would be TR-001.

DVDs

Vinyl

Running Times: Please use the following times as a general guide. They aren't set in stone, if you'd like more info check out: Tips for vinyl pre-mastering.

12" Record at 33 rpm - recommended maximum of 20 minutes

12" Record at 45 rpm - recommended maximum of 14 minutes

This is it, the heart and soul of your record. The audio.

Preferred file format: 24-bit, 96kHz WAV file (already pre-mastered for vinyl).
We can also accept audio CDs and numerous other formats. Give us a call 416-446-0918 and we’ll let you know what works. Just please no MP3s… they don’t translate well onto wax.

Note: If the audio file isn’t mastered for vinyl, or if you've done something funky with the audio, let us know and we'll make sure it sounds good.

Audio File Setup: We require one long WAV file per side. If you have more than one song per side, they need to be sequenced in the correct order (the same order as the finished record). Please leave a 3-5 second gap between the songs to ensure a smooth transition.

File naming:Save your WAV file as Side A and Side B, so we can accurately match them to the label. For example: Side A - Bobcaygeon - The Tragically Hip

Artwork

The templates have been designed to ensure that your job will move quickly and smoothly through our print and packaging departments. Differences as little as 0.1 cm can cause problems in printing and packaging. Any file that is not provided on our templates may incur a $75 out-of-template fee to cover our labor for adjusting your files.

No. A jewel case or DVD case from Train Records may look the same as every other at first glance, but each company has slightly different dimensions. Even a slight deviation from Train Records specifications can cause problems in the printing and packaging process.

We can accept anything that is Adobe photoshop compatible. Please ensure that the final file is at least 300 dpi and in CMYK. Here is a list of file formats we can accept: Adobe Photoshop (.psd), Adobe (.pdf), JPEG (.jpg) Fonts: If you do not flatten the image and would like vector based fonts please include the  TrueType fonts. For PC, each TrueType font will be a single .ttf file.

Train Records is committed to staying current with desktop publishing software and we accept files from most major page layout, illustration and image-editing applications. Some popular desktop applications like Microsoft Publisher are suitable for printing flyers to your home inkjet printer, but are not powerful enough to work in a professional printing environment. Similarly, we cannot accept any layouts or images created in Word or any other word-processing program.

Once you’ve opened the template, do not make any changes to the template itself (e.g. changing or deleting any of the crop marks, changing the page size, etc.). Our templates are created to maximize our in-house productivity. If you alter the template pages, we will have to reformat your job to fit into the original templates, and you will be billed for the work. For maximum compatibility, our templates are saved back to the oldest version we support. You should save your documents in the version you’re actually using. For example, if you are working in Photoshop CS5, do not save your layout file back to Photoshop CS2; save it as Photoshop CS5.

The templates on our website are organized according to product and include illustrations to help you determine which templates you need. We've included the templates on each corresponding product page as well as the main template download page. Don't forget you'll also need a template for printing on the disc itself.

Yes. If you don’t provide layout files for every part of your package, you may have to pay design fees for us to create the missing files. The most commonly omitted files are the on-disc printing.

We have placed type safety boxes, cut lines, bleed lines, and other items in the templates to help us prepare your job for printing. Do not delete or move these elements. Guides and overlays are on non-printing layers that can be turned off or sent to the back if they interfere with your design work. Consult your application’s help file or manual for information on adjusting layers. If you alter the template pages, we will have to reformat your job onto the original templates, and you will be billed for this work.

If your project is going to have a barcode on it (recommended for retail sales, additional 35$ charge) we suggest designating a location (typically on the traycard, or the back cover of your DVD case/digipak/sleeve/etc.) by placing a white rectangle in your design that measures at least 1.25" wide by .5" high.

Bleed is extending any color, photo, or design elements past the cut line. Our print shop trims printed pieces in stacks of hundreds of sheets at a time. This is much faster than trimming individual pieces, at the cost of a little accuracy. Bleed gives the print shop a margin of error when trimming, so that if the cut is a little off, the white of the paper won’t show along the edge. We request you add at least 1/8-inch of bleed to your layouts. Each template has guidelines set up so you can see exactly how much bleed you need to add to your layouts. These are generally the outermost guides. Type safety margins are the opposite of bleed. If you put important information such as a song title or an important part of a photo right up against the crop line, some of it may get cut off. We recommend that you keep your type and other important elements 1/8" inside the crop marks. Each template has guidelines set up so you can see exactly how much safety margin to allow. These are generally the innermost guides.

Generally, for your paper print you can go as small as 5 points for black type on a light or white background, 6 points for white type on a dark, black, or complex background (also known as reverse type). This varies depending on the typeface used. For on-disc printing, we recommend type be no smaller than 6 points, 8 points for reverse type. For smaller type, such as lyrics and credits, we recommend you use simpler typefaces such as Arial, Helvetica, or Times New Roman. Display faces—the “fancier” fonts with lots of detail, like Vivaldi or Edwardian Script—are designed to be used at large sizes, and can be difficult to read even at 10 points.

CMYK and RGB are two different color models, and understanding the difference can mean producing a great-looking insert rather than a muddy, disappointing one. We’ll have to delve into a little science to explain this difference. The RGB color model is used by monitors, televisions, scanners, and digital cameras. A monitor uses very small bands of red, green, and blue light to generate color. For a quick science project, put a drop of water on the front of your monitor in a white area, and it will act like a magnifying glass. You’ll be able to see the red, green, and blue bands. RGB is additive because when you add all three colors together, you get white light; when you turn off all three lights, you get black. By mixing varying amounts of red, green, and blue light, you can create most other colors. The paper of a magazine, catalog, or CD booklet can’t generate light like a computer monitor. It has to rely on reflected light, and the subtractive color model CMYK. When you add cyan, magenta, and yellow together (CMY), you get a color close to black, and when you don’t lay down any ink, you get white—that is, the white of the paper. A fourth color, black, is added for economical and practical reasons, and is referred to by ‘K’ so as not to be confused with blue. By mixing varying amounts of cyan, magenta, yellow, and black inks, you can create most other colors. All commercial, full-color printing uses CMYK inks. So why is the difference important? Most colors created on your RGB monitor can be duplicated using CMYK inks, but not all. Your RGB monitor is generating light, so it can create some bright colors that can’t be duplicated on any CMYK printing press. Paper can only reflect light, so if you print the super-bright RGB colors in CMYK, they get a lot duller. If you’re designing artwork in an RGB color space, we’ll have to convert it to CMYK to print. Depending on your artwork, the colors might shift a little or a lot. We ask you to provide all your images in CMYK. If there are any color shifts, you’ll be able to see them and take steps to correct it. If you supply RGB images, we’ll make the CMYK conversion here, and show you a proof. If you want to make any changes to your images at that point, your job may be delayed and incur additional charges. It’s much better for you to supply us with CMYK files up front.

Process color uses translucent CMYK inks laid on top of one another to fool your eye into seeing other colors. A spot color ink is a specially-mixed hue that is not made by combining two or more inks, but rather is a single ink of a specific color. Spot colors can be brighter or more saturated than process colors, or have special properties, such as metallic gold or fluorescent green. Train Records uses process colors in printing packaging, and spot colors when printing on-disc. Spot colors are available in package printing for an additional fee.

RGB is an additive color format, made by generating light, while on-disc printing uses a subtractive color format, made by reflecting light. On your computer, red, green, and blue combine to make white; on a disc, they would combine to make a muddy black.

All packaging is printed in process (CMYK) color, while standard on-disc printing is done with spot (PMS) inks. While many spot inks and their process equivalents look similar, some colors—blue and orange in particular—look very different. In general, the spot inks used on the disc are brighter and more saturated than their CMYK equivalents. If matching the disc to the rest of the package is important to you, you should design with a Pantone solid-to-process guide handy. That guide will show you which PMS spot colors have close process equivalents. If you upgrade to four-color offset printing on your disc, you will greatly increase the chances of your disc matching the rest of your packaging. Since the packaging will be printed using offset lithography, which is a different process than the silkscreen or offset printing used on the discs, we still won’t be able to provide you with an exact match. You should note however that our years of experience in the trade have made us very effective at providing a very close match.

Discs are printed with a different process than the rest of the packaging. Booklets, digipaks, and jackets are printed with process (CMYK) inks, using a high-quality process called offset lithography. Discs are printed with spot colors, and are silkscreened. There are a couple of key differences to keep in mind: • The tonal range that we can hold while silkscreening the discs is 15-85%. Tones lighter than 15% may blow out to zero, and those darker than 85% may fill in completely. As a result, we do not recommend using very dark or very light photos on the disc. • High-contrast images work best. Subtle changes in tone can be lost in the silkscreening process. • Gradients or blends do not print well, and can look uneven or blotchy. We strongly recommend avoiding gradients or blends on the disc.

No. While inexpensive, ink-jet printers use same CMYK ink model that our printing presses use, the actual inks are not identical. If you printed your design on an HP inkjet or a Canon color laser printer for example, they would all look at least a little different, because each company manufactures their inks a little differently. Since your printer and our press are not calibrated to each other, we cannot accept your printout as an accurate color guide. We will send you a Adobe pdf proof and if colour matching is critical you can request and Epson high-quality proof of your job for you to approve before it goes to press. This proof will be a reliable indicator of final print quality and colours but carries a charge of 80$ per proof.

You don’t need to make your image round to fit on the disc. All the templates come with a circular area for masking any rectangular image. Each application handles this differently, so consult your software’s manual or help file for information on masking your images into the template.

Yes, this is normal. A properly saved 5" x 5" scan, in CMYK color mode at 300 dpi, will take up to 8-10 MB on your hard drive. Photoshop, Illustrator and other professional layout programs will generally create large files. Our online uploader solves the issue of transferring both numerous and large files. We can accept up to 20GB per transfer.

You may email files under 10 MB to our art department: art@trainrec.com or directly to your Product Specialist. If your files are over 10 MB, you will need to use our upload portal.

The primary font format for Window-based computers is TrueType. All of your installed TrueType fonts are usually located in the /WINDOWS/FONTS folder, and contain the .ttf file extension. The filenames can be cryptic, but if you double-click on a font file, you’ll get a preview window so you know you’re copying the right ones. Please do not copy the entire Fonts folder: just copy the individual TrueType font files themselves. If you own any Adobe products for PC, there may be fonts stored in c:/Program Files/Common Files/Adobe/Fonts. Users of Adobe Multiple Master fonts (Mac or PC): At this time we can no longer accept Multiple Master fonts, as our current software cannot utilize these fonts properly. If you are supplying your layout in Photoshop we can still accept .psd files with live text layers using Multiple Master fonts, but we will be unable to edit or modify these text layers.

1) Failure to remove template guide lines. Before you send in your job, make sure you’ve removed all the templates lines.

2) Image resolution is too low (less than 300 dpi) or supplied in RGB instead of CMYK.

3) Insufficient bleed or safety margins.

4) Failure to include fonts.

5) Failure to supply all parts of the job on the Train Records templates. For a complete explanation, see 01. Why should I use the templates? and 07. Do I need to supply layout files for every part of my package?

When you’re ready to submit your job to Train Records, make sure that you’re including all of the following items:

• Files for each part of the job (insert, tray card, on-disc printing, etc.)

• All the fonts used in the layouts

• Any special instructions you may have.

You should also do a final proofread of all your text and layouts to make sure everything is accurate and complete. Organize the files on the disk clearly. Set up separate folders for layout files, images, fonts, not-for-output files, etc. If you submit a disk with dozens of unorganized and/or unnecessary files, your project will be delayed.

Artwork Templates

Artwork Design Templates:

Before submitting your files, your artwork must conform to our templates. The templates below will help you prepare your artwork and ensure the sizes are correct. When your files are complete, upload them by Clicking Here. Should you have any questions, please refer to our Artwork FAQ section or contact our art department by emailing: art@trainrec.com. After all, we are here to help!


CD & DVD Disc Templates

CD Duplication

CD / DVD 22mm

Full Colour Disc Face

CD Duplication

CD / DVD 39mm

Black Text on Silver Discs

CD Digipaks

4 Panel CD Digipak

6 Panel CD Digipak Tray on Right

6 Panel CD Digipak

Tray on right side

6 Panel CD Digipak

Tray Centered

 CD / DVD Sleeves

2 Panel CD Sleeves

2 Panel Sleeve

4 Panel Sleeve

 

6 Panel Sleeve

 CD Inserts

1 Panel Insert

1 Panel Insert

2 Panel Insert

2 Panel Insert

3 Panel Insert

3 Panel Insert

CD Stapled Booklets

8 Page CD Booklet

8 Page Booklet

12 Page CD Booklet

12 Page Booklet

16 Page CD Booklet

16 Page Booklet

CD Tray Card

CD Tray Card

CD Tray Card

DVD Covers (Trap sheets)

DVD Cover Standard 14mm

DVD Cover

Standard 14mm

DVD Cover Slim 7mm

DVD Cover

Slim 7mm

DVD Trap Sheet Fat

DVD Cover
Multi Disc
"Fat Pack" 22mm

DVD Digipaks

4 Panel DVD Digipak

4 Panel DVD Digipak

6 Panel DVD Digipak

6 Panel DVD Digipak

 

Vinyl Record Center Labels

12" Vinyl Record Center Label

12" Vinyl Record
Center Label

 


12" Vinyl Record Center Label

7" Vinyl Record
Center Label

 

 

Vinyl Record Jackets Vinyl record jacket

12" Vinyl Record Jacket
without Spine

Vinyl record jacket

12" Vinyl Record Jacket
with Spine

7 inch Vinyl Jacket Template

7" Vinyl Record Jacket

Vinyl Record
Gatefold Jackets
12" Vinyl Record Gatefold Jacket

12" Vinyl Record Jacket
4 Panel Gatefold